NAES Students Enjoy Relay for Life Field Day

Students received a free bicycle helmet through the Brain Matters program.
Health Rotation Assistant Teacher Carolyn Montgomery presents a Reject All Tobacco (RAT) lesson to students.

New Albany Elementary students enjoyed a day of fun and education while raising money for the American Cancer Society at the Relay for Life Field Day on May 15, 2017.  This year the students and staff raised approximately $3,000.00.

School Resource Officer P.J. Doyle discusses safety tips including stranger danger and using the buddy system.

“Field Day was a great time for us to bring together many of the components of Coordinated School Health that we work with throughout the school year,” said Tammie Reeder, School Health Coordinator.  “Health education, physical education, and family and community involvement are three very important components of Coordinated School Health that we were able to address during our annual Relay for Life Field Day.”

Students participated in several educational activities and fun events during the day-long field day. Children learned health and safety information, played fun games, enjoyed snacks, and were entertained by fellow students during the annual talent show.

Representatives from local and state organizations were on hand to teach important concepts related to health and safety.  Baptist Memorial Hospital-Union County provided education related to summer safety.  The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers provided information regarding water safety.  School Resource Officer P.J. Doyle spoke to students about basic safety tips include “stranger danger”.  Health Rotation Assistant Teacher Carolyn Montgomery provided an education station and discussed the harmful effects of tobacco.

This year, the Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation had representatives to present the “Brain Matters” program which focused on wearing helmets.  Each student received a free bike helmet through this presentation.

The closing program for the day honored cancer survivors who were special guests of NAES students.  The ceremony was dedicated to the memory of C.J. Garner, a student at NAES who lost his battle to cancer in August 2016.  His family were special guests during the ceremony and his second grade classmates sang a song in his memory.

“We appreciate all of the help we received from area agencies, our own NAES staff, as well as students and parents,” Reeder said.  “This day is a lot of fun and educational awareness that our students look forward to each year.”

Students learn about water safety and the importance of learning to swim.

New Albany Students Attend Career & Technology Day

The New Albany School of Career & Technical Education hosted “Career & Technology Day” on Friday, May 5 on the campus of New Albany High School.

Career and Technology Day began as Technology Day in 2009 to expose high school students to the technology used in industries and careers in the northeast Mississippi area. The event has been held annually since 2009 and has grown to include more college and career related information.

This year the Career and Tech Day was expanded to include students from 3rd-8th grade in the New Albany School District.  Students from New Albany Elementary School and New Albany Middle School were able to participate in this year’s event and received backpacks to place the career information they received during the day.

Career and Technology Day was funded through the “PRIDE through College and Career Awareness” grant that the New Albany School District received through funding from the Toyota Wellspring Fund.

More than twenty-five exhibitors and presenters were on hand to inform students about their careers, as well as describe the technology that is used in their careers.   Vendors included:  Blue Mountain College; Northeast Mississippi Community College; University of Mississippi; MSU Extension Service; Miracle Ear; Rowan Dentistry; Mississippi Game and Fish; Mississippi Forestry Commission, U.S. Army Corp of Engineers; Leggett and Platt; MooreSites; Cooper Electric; BNA Bank; New Albany Light, Gas, & Water; Tennessee Valley Authority; Baptist Memorial Hospital-Union County; New Albany Police Department; New Albany Fire Department; Union County Sheriff’s Department; Northeast Union County Volunteer Fire Department; Mississippi Highway Patrol; Mississippi National Guard; Mississippi Department of Health; Mississippi Department of Human Services; and WTVA News.

 

 

NA Recycles Visits NAES First Grade

First grade students at New Albany Elementary School (NAES) have been participating in a unit of study that focuses on taking care of our Earth.  As a culminating event, students learned more about recycling.

Community volunteer Amy Livingston, representing NA Recycles, visited first grade classes on May 1.

First grade teachers, Livingston, NAES Counselor April Hobson, and NAES School Resource Officer P.J. Doyle worked together to plan the event.

Livingston, Doyle, and Hobson performed a skit to show students how to reduce, reuse, and recycle.  Doyle played the part of “Michael Recycle”.

During the presentation, students learned the chant:  “Recycle, Recycle do it now.  Recycle, Recycle you know how.  Recycle, Recycle we yell ‘wow’”.   Students also sorted objects to recycle and decided if an item could be reused.

“The collaboration among our school, the city, and New Albany Recycles has taught our students the importance of recycling and allowed us to incorporate recycling as a daily part of life at NAES!,”  Counselor April Hobson said about this year’s focus on recycling at NAES.

Livingston added, “In order to be better stewards of the environment, I believe education is the key and we need to start young!”

 

 

 

New Stage Theatre Provides Performances for New Albany Schools

New Stage Theatre, a professional theatre located in Jackson, Mississippi, presented in-school performances of The Selfish Giant and Oh Freedom! The Story of the Underground Railroad to students in the New Albany School District on February 16-17.

New Albany Elementary School hosted two performances of The Selfish Giant on Thursday, February 16.  Oscar Wilde’s classic children’s story about The Selfish Giant who wouldn’t share his beautiful garden becomes a joyous play that touches on themes of friendship, empathy, sharing, and kindness. The giant comes home from a long trip to find children playing in his garden. He kicks them out, threatening to bring them to justice for trespassing. But a harsh winter—in the form of comic characters Frost, Snow, and North Wind—brings the realization to the giant that the children who used to trespass in his garden implanted friendship in this special place. The giant’s heart melts in a life-changing moment, and spring, along with the children, returns to his garden.

Oh Freedom!  The Story of the Underground Railroad was presented to New Albany Middle School and New Albany High School students on Friday, February 17.  The greatest collaboration against racism in American history, before the Civil Rights Movement, was the Underground Railroad. People of all ethnic backgrounds, of both sexes, and from North and South came together to resist the oppression of slavery by helping escaped slaves make their way to free territory in the years before the Civil War. Oh Freedom! The Story of the Underground Railroad celebrates these alliances by combining the many stories with songs of the period. Famous participants like Harriet Tubman and Harriet Beecher Stowe are represented as well as lesser known heroes of the movement like John Rankin, whose house on a hill was a beacon for freedom; the mysterious “Peg Leg” Joe who moved among the plantations teaching slaves to escape and “Follow the Drinking Gourd,” a song designed to show them the way; and Henry “Box” Brown who had himself put in a box and mailed to freedom. The production will encourage student audience participation in the singing of traditional spiritual, “Oh, Freedom.” The story inspires all to work together for the good of all as it celebrates a time when Americans were at their courageous best, supporting one another—regardless of background, ethnicity or gender—in the cause to extend to all Americans our greatest, most inalienable right: freedom.

New Stage Theatre is a professional not-for-profit theatre.  New Stage Theatre’s Arts-in-Education tours are supported, in part, by Entergy, the Chisholm Foundation, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Mississippi, and the Mississippi Arts Commission.

NAES Second Grade Teacher Uses Flexible Seating Classroom

Two pedal desks have been added to Amber Peters’ flexible seating classroom thanks to funding from Dean Provence Endowment for Excellence in Education grant program.

Amber Peters, a second grade teacher at New Albany Elementary School, has implemented a flexible seating arrangement into her classroom this year.   The seating arrangement includes rocking game chairs, exercise balls, a couch, a cushioned chair, and carpet spots.

This month, Peters has been able to add two pedal desks to her arrangement thanks to funding from the Dean Provence Endowment for Education in Excellence grant program for teachers.

Peters says that she has read several articles about the different flexible seating options that are available, as well as the benefits of flexible seating in a classroom.  “Most of the research shows a slight improvement in student behavior and attention,” she stated.

If you were to visit this second grade classroom, you would notice a chart taking up a portion of the whiteboard.  This chart lets students know where they will sit for the day.  “My students are definitely excited about where they will sit each day. It gives them something to look forward to,” Peters said. I think they feel more at home, because most of the seats are relaxed. I believe there is an excitement to be at school which does spill over and help keep the students motivated to learn.”

2nd Grade students participate in a science lesson while enjoy flexible seating in rocking, gaming chairs.

When asked if she had noticed an increase in the improvement of behavior, Peters said that she had not had any discipline referrals or major discipline issues this year.   She did add that she has had to spend a small amount of time dealing with students who are having difficulty handing certain seating arrangements.  She has kept a few standard classroom desks in her room when instances such as this arise.

Flexible seating in the classroom is something Peters plans to continue next school year and is excited to see how a new class of students will respond to concept.